Cardiovascular Health

“One in four deaths in the United States is attributed to heart disease. Our researchers study how behavior, environment, and genetics affect heart health and how screening and treatment can reduce risk.”

Laura B. Harrington, PhD, MPH
Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute Assistant Investigator

Research overview

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for Americans. Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute (KPWHRI) scientists are working to understand how to reduce our risk of heart attacks, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases throughout life. 

Addressing risk factors, improving diagnosis, and exploring how medications, genes, and everyday life affect our cardiovascular health at different ages and stages are central to this work — as is translating research findings into practical, personalized care.

“We’ve found that helping patients and health care teams work together on personalized care plans is the best path to lifelong heart health,” says Beverly Green, MD, MPH, whose recent work has focused on improving the diagnosis of high blood pressure.

Additional focus areas for KPWHRI scientists include exploring the impact of cardiovascular diseases on other health conditions — and vice versa. Recently, this has led researchers Sascha Dublin, MD, PhD, and Laura B. Harrington, PhD, MPH, to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on cardiovascular health.

Below are other research highlights from KPWHRI’s cardiovascular health scientists (please visit their bios to learn more):

  • In 2016 Dr. Green, a senior investigator, launched the BP-CHECK study, which aims to find the easiest, most accurate way to diagnose high blood pressure. With a $2.8 million award from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), the study compares blood pressure readings taken in clinic, at home, and at validated blood pressure kiosks to the 24-hour blood pressure test that is currently considered the gold standard for diagnosing hypertension.
     
  • Dr. Dublin, a senior investigator, explores many different facets of cardiovascular disease in her work, including risk factors for atrial fibrillation, the effect of medications on cardiovascular disease, and the relationship between cardiovascular disease and other conditions, such as dementia. Managing cardiovascular risk factors in pregnancy — such as high blood pressure and diabetes — is a particular interest.
     
  • Dr. Harrington, an assistant investigator, is a cardiovascular epidemiologist whose research aims to improve understanding of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, particularly among older women. Currently, she is leading a study exploring the relationship between physical activity, sedentary behavior, and the risk of venous thromboembolism (blood clots that form predominantly in the veins of the legs or lungs). In addition to this work, Dr. Harrington conducts research in the areas of recurrent cardiovascular event risk, cardiovascular health in relation to cognitive decline and dementia risk in later life, and pharmacologic exposures in relation to cardiovascular event risk, with a particular focus on risk factors for venous thromboembolism.
     
  • Senior Investigator Michael L. Parchman, MD, MPH, focuses on implementing evidence-based cardiovascular disease care into primary care settings. He led the 4-year Healthy Hearts Northwest trial, an EvidenceNOW initiative that helped smaller primary care practices in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho adopt evidence-based approaches to improving cardiovascular care outcomes. The trial continues to produce findings of importance.
     
  • The work of Ellen O'Meara, PhD, a senior research associate, centers on the epidemiology of common and important health conditions in the United States, including cardiovascular disease. Her collaborative research has included studies exploring the risk factors and outcomes of heart disease and stroke. Recent work includes research on quality improvement aimed at controlling hypertension at small primary care practices.

Recent publications on Cardiovascular Health

Thompson MJ, Anderson ML, Cook AJ, Ehrlich K, Hall YN, Hsu C, Margolis KL, McClure JB, Munson SA, Green BB. Acceptability and adherence to home, kiosk, and clinic blood pressure measurement compared to 24-h ambulatory monitoring. J Gen Intern Med. 2023 Jan 17:1-8. doi: 10.1007/s11606-023-08036-3. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

Huguet N, Green BB, Voss RW, Larson AE, Angier H, Miguel M, Liu S, Latkovic-Taber M, DeVoe JE. Factors associated with blood pressure control among patients in community health centers. Am J Prev Med. 2023 Jan 4:S0749-3797(22)00564-5. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2022.11.002. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed

Baldwin LM, Tuzzio L, Cole AM, Holden E, Powell JA, Parchman ML. Tailoring implementation strategies for cardiovascular disease risk calculator adoption in primary care clinics. J Am Board Fam Med. 2022 Dec 23 ;35(6):jabfm.2022.210449R11143-1155. doi: 10.3122/jabfm.2022.210449R1. [Epub ahead of print 2022 Dec 2]. PubMed

Margolis KL, Bergdall AR, Crain AL, JaKa MM, Anderson JP, Solberg LI, Sperl-Hillen J, Beran M, Green BB, Haugen P, Norton CK, Kodet AJ, Sharma R, Appana D, Trower NK, Pawloski PA, Rehrauer DJ, Simmons ML, McKinney ZJ, Kottke TE, Ziegenfuss JY, Williams RA, O'Connor PJ. Comparing pharmacist-led telehealth care and clinic-based care for uncontrolled high blood pressure: The hyperlink 3 pragmatic cluster-randomized trial. Hypertension. 2022 Oct 25. doi: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.122.19816. Online ahead of print. PubMed

Thibord F, Klarin D, Brody JA, Chen MH, Levin MG, Chasman DI, Goode EL, Hveem K, Teder-Laving M, Martinez-Perez A, Aïssi D, Daian-Bacq D, Ito K, Natarajan P, Lutsey PL, Nadkarni GN, de Vries PS, Cuellar-Partida G, Wolford BN, Pattee JW, Kooperberg C, Braekkan SK, Li-Gao R, Saut N, Sept C, Germain M, Judy RL, Wiggins KL, Ko D, O'Donnell CJ, Taylor KD, Giulianini F, De Andrade M, Nøst TH, Boland A, Empana JP, Koyama S, Gilliland T, Do R, Huffman JE, Wang X, Zhou W, Manuel Soria J, Carlos Souto J, Pankratz N, Haessler J, Hindberg K, Rosendaal FR, Turman C, Olaso R, Kember RL, Bartz TM, Lynch JA, Heckbert SR, Armasu SM, Brumpton B, Smadja DM, Jouven X, Komuro I, Clapham KR, Loos RJF, Willer CJ, Sabater-Lleal M, Pankow JS, Reiner AP, Morelli VM, Ridker PM, Vlieg AVH, Deleuze JF, Kraft P, Rader DJ; Global Biobank Meta-Analysis Initiative; Estonian Biobank Research Team; 23andMe Research Team; Biobank Japan; CHARGE Hemostasis Working Group, Min Lee K, Psaty BM, Heidi Skogholt A, Emmerich J, Suchon P, Rich SS, Vy HMT, Tang W, Jackson RD, Hansen JB, Morange PE, Kabrhel C, Trégouët DA, Damrauer SM, Johnson AD, Smith NL. Cross-ancestry investigation of venous thromboembolism genomic predictors. Circulation. 2022 Sep 26;101161CIRCULATIONAHA122059675. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.122.059675. Online ahead of print. PubMed

Researchers in Cardiovascular Health

Sascha Dublin, MD, PhD

Senior Investigator
206-287-2870
Sascha.Dublin@kp.org

Curriculum vitae (CV)

Beverly B. Green, MD, MPH

Senior Investigator
206-287-2997
Bev.B.Green@kp.org

Curriculum vitae (CV)

Laura Harrington, PhD, MPH

Assistant Investigator
206-287-2066
Laura.B.Harrington@kp.org

Curriculum vitae (CV)

Michael L. Parchman, MD, MPH

Senior Investigator, ACT Center
206-287-2704
Michael.X.Parchman@kp.org

Curriculum vitae (CV)

Ellen O'Meara, PhD

Principal Collaborative Scientist
206-287-2938
Ellen.S.O'Meara@kp.org

Curriculum vitae (CV)

Nicole M. Gatto, PhD, MPH

Principal Collaborative Scientist
Nicole.M.Gatto@kp.org

Curriculum vitae (CV)

 

Affiliate researchers

James Floyd, MD, MS
Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology
University of Washington

Susan Heckbert, MD, PhD
University of Washington (UW) Department of Epidemiology; UW Cardiovascular Health Research Unit

Nicholas L. Smith, PhD, MPH
UW Professor, Epidemiology, Cardiovascular Health Research Unit
Director, Seattle Epidemiology and Information Resource Center, VA Puget Sound Health Care System